The Fashion Industry’s Standards and How They Affect Young Women

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With or without realizing it, society is constantly subjected to the influences of the fashion industry. A major reason for this is social media, however, this influence still exists throughout billboards, magazines and television. VALLEY believes that it is important that young women and young men understand ways in which these influences and standards promoted by the fashion industry may affect us. 

First of all, it is important to note that many companies have gotten increasingly better at promoting inclusivity as models of all shapes and sizes, as well as color, are being used to represent their brands.

This variety is being seen recently more and more for pretty much the first time in history, which is truly a wonderful and inspiring thing. However, this does not take away from the decades of size zero women with porcelain skin who have been promoted by every brand on every magazine cover and social media platform.  

Video from PrettyLittleThing on Youtube

VALLEY spoke with Emily Fallon, senior at FIT, who has had ample experience within this industry in the city which is the epicenter of it all.

“As far as industry standards go and how they impact young women, I think the major thing and what we talk about most in school is the image that models portray. The size zero models wearing the clothes that you see creates this feeling that we are supposed to look like that or we are considered to be unattractive which leads to depression, anxiety and eating disorders,” Emily says. 

This ideal standard of the “perfect woman” that the fashion industry has sculpted and promoted for years on end contributes to many insecurities and mental health issues among young women who may not look this way. This same concept applies to the effects on young men as they walk by Abercrombie billboards of masculine guys who have sculpted abs and biceps.

When acknowledging these models so frequently seen around us, it is important to keep in mind that a lot of what the fashion industry promotes is a whole lot of editing and unrealistic standards. Additionally, one’s perception of beauty is not someone else’s. 

As stated earlier, it is a wonderful thing that the fashion industry has begun promoting different body types and ethnicities for a more inclusive and confidence-boosting environment for all.

“I absolutely love Aerie’s brand message, they are a great example of an all-inclusive brand if you’re ever curious to look into it!” says Emily.

Video from @aerie on Youtube

Tag @VALLEYmag on Twitter with your favorite fashion brand that promotes body positivity among young men and women!

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